Graham Crackers and Good Taste

Why do we accept so easily that we might want foods that aren’t good for us but question the very notion that there is such a thing as music that might be bad for us?  Although we seem to be losing the terminology to connotations of snobbery the very notion of “good taste” connects the value of food to the value of other pillars of culture such as music, poetry and the visual arts.  In a recent article within the Journal of the Society for Classical Learning Ken Myers explains how for centuries it was assumed that good taste is a learned skill and that the purpose of education is to train students to acquire good taste so that they would love what is good and shun what is evil.

Wine glass and graham cracker

Any mother of small children knows this is a daily and daunting task.  My two year old for instance insists that he must only eat bananas and graham crackers with peanut butter.  My first two children were always brilliant eaters ready to devour lima beans, raw mushrooms and lentils so I’ve been stunned by the incredible pickiness of my younger two.  Especially the baby.  I look at his older sister and see that with much encouragement she has begun to accept some forms of sauce and peas and broccoli.  Dum spiro spero.  There is time for his palate to develop although I don’t suppose it would naturally unless I continue offering and suggesting alternatives.  And it isn’t only food we discuss.

Mothers are not usually at the mercy of cultural relativism.  We are bombarded by the conclusions of studies and the wisdom of authorities as to what our children should eat, watch, sing and play.  I am constantly worrying over the shows my children watch, the clothes they wear, the music they listen to and the amount of time they play outside.  These things are important and I wouldn’t believe myself if I were to suggest otherwise.  Perhaps, however we should be more concerned about the process of where we are taking our children rather than fixating on what products they are using at this exact moment.  There is so much truth, goodness and beauty in the world and perhaps the most important way as a mother to teach my children to love the true good and beautiful is to delight in such things myself.  Sure they may run around the house like crazy people while I play Handel’s Israel in Egypt in the background and not notice, I don’t play it for them, I play it for myself.  I may only get two lines of Dante read while the kids are suppose to be playing on the Chick-fil-e playground but at least I am holding a cup of coffee and a book and my body remembers what that’s like for a moment.  They may be whining about how it’s taking forever as we pray the final prayers of the evening prayer service but I need to pray those words.  I hope in the context of kisses and laughter one day the children will grow to love the things my husband and I love.

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About Rebecca

Christian, artist, wife, mother, teacher, tea drinker View all posts by Rebecca

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